Cork and the human guilty pleasures

The homeland of cork oak is the Mediterranean region. The homeland of wine is also the Mediterranean. Of course, cork couldn’t simply pass on its neighbor and entered into a thousand year collaboration with this particular craft.

Thousands of years ago, amphorae with wine were sealed with cork plugs.

During the times of ancient Egypt and ancient Greece, the storage and quality of wine depended on the quality of the cork in the amphora. In the Roman Empire, vessels with wine and oil were also sealed with cork bark. During the Pompeii excavations, amphorae with preserved corks were discovered.

At the beginning of the 17th century, the French monk Dom Perignon saw flasks of water, closed with natural cork, from Spanish merchants. This prompted him to use the cork to seal the effervescent wine produced at the monastery. A little later in the 18th century, the French king Louis XV, in his champagne

law, obliged natural cork to be used. During production, it was manually plugged into a bottle and tied on the outside with cords for reliability.

Nowadays, the quality and prestige of wine is judged by what kind of cork is inside the bottle: the most expensive ones are made of solid cork bark, bleached (discolored) and their wholesale price reaches up to 2 euros per piece.

Other human pleasures include leisure and sports. Cork also played a big role in these activities.

Cork is used in various forms in the making of the sports equipment such as boards to teach swimming, surfing boards, kayaks, and canoes, balls for field and ice hockey, baseball, and in archery and dart targets. To have leisure in a comfortable environment, there is a whole gamma of cork products: Sleeping pillows, certain types of bedding and yoga accessories. After all, cork is a completely hypoallergenic product!

Micro mites and other insects will never spread in such pillows, which cannot be said about bird feather stuffing. Overall, due to its unique properties, cork is an absolutely irreplaceable product, used much more widely than it seems at first glance.

The homeland of cork oak is the Mediterranean region. The homeland of wine is also the Mediterranean. Of course, cork couldn’t simply pass on its neighbor and entered into a thousand year collaboration with this particular craft.

Thousands of years ago, amphorae with wine were sealed with cork plugs.

During the times of ancient Egypt and ancient Greece, the storage and quality of wine depended on the quality of the cork in the amphora. In the Roman Empire, vessels with wine and oil were also sealed with cork bark. During the Pompeii excavations, amphorae with preserved corks were discovered.

At the beginning of the 17th century, the French monk Dom Perignon saw flasks of water, closed with natural cork, from Spanish merchants. This prompted him to use the cork to seal the effervescent wine produced at the monastery. A little later in the 18th century, the French king Louis XV, in his champagne

law, obliged natural cork to be used. During production, it was manually plugged into a bottle and tied on the outside with cords for reliability.

Nowadays, the quality and prestige of wine is judged by what kind of cork is inside the bottle: the most expensive ones are made of solid cork bark, bleached (discolored) and their wholesale price reaches up to 2 euros per piece.

Other human pleasures include leisure and sports. Cork also played a big role in these activities.

Cork is used in various forms in the making of the sports equipment such as boards to teach swimming, surfing boards, kayaks, and canoes, balls for field and ice hockey, baseball, and in archery and dart targets. To have leisure in a comfortable environment, there is a whole gamma of cork products: Sleeping pillows, certain types of bedding and yoga accessories. After all, cork is a completely hypoallergenic product!

Micro mites and other insects will never spread in such pillows, which cannot be said about bird feather stuffing. Overall, due to its unique properties, cork is an absolutely irreplaceable product, used much more widely than it seems at first glance.

Copyright © 2021 Fomentarino. All rights reserved.